Morrisville State College

School of Agriculture & Natural Resources

 

Department of Environmental Sciences Faculty/Staff


bkelly

Name: Brendan Kelly, Society of American Foresters – Certified Forester

Title: Assistant Professor of Forestry and Renewable Resources

Phone: (315) 684- 6219
Fax:
(315) 684-6125

E-mail: kellybt@morrisville.edu 
Web:
http://people.morrisville.edu/~kellybt


Current Teaching:

image006.jpgNATR 100 - INTRODUCTION TO FORESTRY AND NATURAL RESOURCES

Field identification of important forest trees and shrubs, their growth characteristics and uses are introduced. Basic instruction is provided in forest management problems, forest measurement, utilization, forest ecology, silviculture, forest wetlands, natural resources recreation, wildlife conservation, urban forestry and natural resource organizations. Several field forestry exercises are used to provide students with practical experience.

3 credits (2 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours), fall semester

 

(Image on right: Students measure trees in an Introduction to Forestry and Natural Resources laboratory exercise in 2011 at the Galbreath Woodlot Property.)

 

 

 

 

Tamarack Overstory at Sadoff 2011-02-15_11-08-04_520.jpg

NATR 115 - FOREST ECOLOGY

Physical and biological factors that affect the forest community are discussed. Emphasis is placed on forest ecosystem dynamics and establishing a scientific basis for the cultural treatment of forest stands. Forest community interactions are discussed in detail. Specific types of old growth, wetland and eastern mesophytic forest communities are analyzed.

Prerequisite: NATR 100 or permission of instructor

3 credits (2 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours), spring semester

 

 

(Image on left: Tamarack overstory in the Nelson Swamp on the Sadoff Property in 2011.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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NATR 144 - SEMINAR IN ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES I (COORDINATOR)

Designed to inform the freshman Natural Resources Conservation student with the various options of study within the curriculum and the career opportunities for each. Other presentations will deal with such topics as enhancing your classroom success, the pre-registration process, ethics, placement, letters of applications, resumes, interviewing techniques and meeting professionals from various environmental fields. Required for all freshman Natural Resources Conservation students.

1 credit (1 hour recitation), fall semester

 

(Image on right: Students listen to Brett Gore of the US Fish and Wildlife Service during a Seminar in Environmental Resources lecture in 2011.)

 

 

 

 

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NATR 215 - PRACTICES OF SILVICULTURE

Application is made of Silvicultural techniques for tending the forest stand in order to meet the objectives of the forest owner utilizing the principles of forest ecology. Emphasis is on understanding the forest ecosystem and the impact of cultural practices such as thinning, harvest cutting, timber stand improvement and stand regeneration.

Prerequisite: NATR 110 and NATR 115

Co-requisite: NATR 213

3 credits (2 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours), spring semester

 

(Image on left: Students work in the Gates’ Woodlot at the West Hill Property during the winter of 2010-2011.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

image005.jpgRREN 302 - RIPARIAN ECOLOGY AND WETLAND MANAGEMENT

roberts&cimpiThe focus of this course is on processing functions and structure of riparian and wetland areas and the multiple human influences on these areas. The future options for management of these areas will be stressed. Lectures are used to introduce students to the principles and concepts; and laboratory exercises are used to visit and evaluate field sites for future management consideration.

Prerequisites: college-level course in ecosystems or permission of instructor

3 credits (2 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours), fall semester 

 

(Image on right: Students assist the US Fish and Wildlife Service with a riparian forest habitat restoration project in 2007.)

 

(Image on left: Students conduct a soil color exercise in a Riparian Ecology and Wetland Management laboratory in 2011.)

 

 

 

RREN 420 - GEOSPATIAL TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS I

               (This is a team taught Course with Dr. Walid Shayya and Prof./Dept. Chair William Snyder)

This course involves the presentation of two integrated teaching modules that focus on the application of geospatial technology to forest and wildlife management. The first module includes the application of geospatial technologies to the integrated management and monitoring of forest land. The second module utilizes the application of geospatial technology to assess habitat resources for wildlife management. The two modules incorporate the global positioning system (GPS), geographic information system (GIS), and remote sensing technologies combined with field-tested, scientifically-based principles providing an integrated approach to natural resources management. The two modules are vertically integrated where

field measurements are combined based on common sampling points.

Pre- or Co-requisite: RREN 303; (senior standing or permission of the instructor)

1 credit (2 lecture hours, 2 laboratory hours), 5-week course, spring semester

 

RREN 421 - GEOSPATIAL TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS II

               (This is a team taught Course with Dr. Walid Shayya and Prof./Dept. Chair William Snyder)

This is an elective course in the Renewable Resources Technology B. Tech. program where students are expected to master the application of geospatial technology to natural resources management through independent and group projects where many of the college properties will be inventoried using the methodology covered in RREN 420. The course follows integrated approaches to the management and monitoring of forest land as well as the assessment of habitat resources for wildlife management by focusing on a new college property each year. Geospatial technologies including the global positioning system (GPS), geographic information system (GIS), and remote sensing are combined with field-tested, scientifically-based principles providing an integrated approach to natural resources management of the

forest.

Prerequisites: RREN 420 with a B or better and approval of instructor

2 credits (1 hour of lecture and 4 hours of laboratory), 10-week course, fall semester

 

RREN 470 - INTERNSHIP IN RENEWABLE RESOURCES

               (Prof. Kelly is a planning and internship advisor with other faculty.)

This course involves supervised fieldwork at an approved placement site.  Students carry out a planned program of educational work experiences under direct supervision of an owner, manager, or supervisor. . Each intern is advised and monitored by a member of the faculty on a regular basis.  Requirements include a journal, interim reports, supervisor evaluations, a summary report and an oral presentation.

Prerequisite: RREN 450

 

 

Program Interests:

 Woodlands and Natural Areas Management


Last Updated on January 10, 2012.

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